Cultivating Kids Creativity

Cultivating Kids Creativity

Newborn babies come into this world with no knowledge of right, wrong, good or bad. They are just like us, but they have not yet been conditioned to our way of life. Since we believe it is our job as parents to shape and mold them into model human beings, we get started on it shortly after birth.

To begin, we put them on a feeding schedule and subject them to painful medical procedures.  By the time babies cut their first tooth, they have already learned that their needs don't matter all that much. As they mature, we continue to mold our children’s behavior through coaxing, discipline, rewards – whatever gets them to fall in line with “normal” society.

Beginning at the tender age of four or five, we force our kids to attend school whether they want to or not. Young children are made to sit at desks for hours on end, and if they upset their teacher, we punish them. If they are resistant to the punishment, we put them on drugs.  We manage their behavior and exert control over our children until they graduate High School, and some of us even retain our control during college years.

Most adults live in a reality with possibilities that are familiar yet stale. But a child's reality is unlimited in creative possibilities, and thus they are unlimited in their ability to create anything they want.

The younger the child, the purer their creative energy. But as our children grow older, their memories become clouded with expectations, judgment, shame, etc. Instead of seeing them as equals, the most well meaning of us view our kids as being in need of some fixing.

They rebel at many different ages, and we punish them into submission. If we succeed, the child becomes an adult who knows that life is difficult, and that we win by conforming and competing against one another.

Through our own conditioning, we have led ourselves to believe that without discipline our kids would turn out all "wrong". Discipline is essential for a fulfilling life, but can be developed organically as Self Discipline. Instilling discipline from the outside inward creates a form of self discipline that is based on feelings of fear, guilt, shame and self doubt.

When anyone behaves a certain way for fear of punishment, they develop a habit of being led toward what they believe to be "right" actions through uncomfortable and painful emotion. The emotions of fear, shame, and guilt are prevalent in our society today, and they are the driving force behind a majority of our thoughts and actions.

As adults, it is our overwhelment with these emotions that causes conflict in our minds which translates to conflict in our lives and conflict in our world. Emotional instability is also the source of all addictive behavior. Conversely, adults with an emotional slate as pure as a child’s are naturally peaceful, loving and productive as they joyfully pursue their life's purpose.

Children are strongly connected to their truth, and they act in their own best interest. If we allow them to cultivate this, and couple it with worldly knowledge being gained through their own curiosity, they will make the determination that their best interest is always created when they honor their higher Self.  When the higher Self is honored, all things benefit from our presence in the world.

It is the children who have the most potential to improve our reality in ways we do not understand, yet we do our best to stop them from creating anything that has not already been created. If we could simply see past the limitations we have created through our self image, and accept these young creators as our saviors, we will be supporting and encouraging the creation of an amazing new world.

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